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Online magazine in Dutch and English about art and culture from Maghreb to Mashreq and beyond.
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Nederlands- en Engelstalig online magazine over kunst en cultuur uit de Maghreb tot de Mashreq en verder.
(Cartoon shows Moroccan atheist telling and then shouting to someone who fasts during ramadan: “I’m not fasting.. I’m not going to fast.. I told you I’m not fasting, don’t you understand me?!”)
More in English below
Mariam Elmaslouhi schrijft als een van onze ramadanbloggers:

Ik ken Marokkanen in Nederland als leden van een gemeenschap die betrokken is. En misschien is dat wel ons probleem: die enorme betrokkenheid. We doen mee, willen erbij horen en het liefst ook geprezen worden door autochtonen. Maar ik vind het juist belangrijker is dat wij als Marokkaanse gemeenschap in Nederland elkaar steunen.
Waarom keren we niet-vastende Marokkanen de rug toe, terwijl we wel autochtonen en zelfs racisten uitnodigen voor iftars en ze hartelijk koekjes meegeven? Ik vind het ook erg dat wij ook de PVV napraten en over onze jongens spreken als ‘tuig’. Ik hoorde eens een Marokkaanse praten over onze jongeren alsof het honden zijn. “Je weet toch hna lmgharba (wij Marokkanen)” wordt er dan gezegd, “wij zoeken altijd problemen”.

Lees verder hier: Waarom keren we niet-vastende Marokkanen de rug toe?
Zie hier een overzicht van de andere teksten bij onze ramadanblogreeks.
Short translation of this latest text on our website:
Dutch-Moroccan Mariam Elmaslouhi writes as one of our ramadanbloggers about how Moroccans treat Moroccans who don’t fast. She asks why Moroccans in the Netherlands put so much energy in seeking support and approval of the White Autochtoon Dutch community while they turn their backs on people of their own community.
She asks why Moroccans who don’t fast are not accepted while Moroccan Muslims invite White Autochtoon Dutch people and even racists for iftars. Elmaslouhi hopes for a stronger Moroccan community to fight racism toghether and to defend the freedoms of all Moroccans.
(Autochtonen is what the white Dutch and Belgians call themselves, while immigrants, and especially Muslims, are labeled Allochtonen which means being ‘alien to this land’.)

(Cartoon shows Moroccan atheist telling and then shouting to someone who fasts during ramadan: “I’m not fasting.. I’m not going to fast.. I told you I’m not fasting, don’t you understand me?!”)

More in English below

Mariam Elmaslouhi schrijft als een van onze ramadanbloggers:

Ik ken Marokkanen in Nederland als leden van een gemeenschap die betrokken is. En misschien is dat wel ons probleem: die enorme betrokkenheid. We doen mee, willen erbij horen en het liefst ook geprezen worden door autochtonen. Maar ik vind het juist belangrijker is dat wij als Marokkaanse gemeenschap in Nederland elkaar steunen.

Waarom keren we niet-vastende Marokkanen de rug toe, terwijl we wel autochtonen en zelfs racisten uitnodigen voor iftars en ze hartelijk koekjes meegeven? Ik vind het ook erg dat wij ook de PVV napraten en over onze jongens spreken als ‘tuig’. Ik hoorde eens een Marokkaanse praten over onze jongeren alsof het honden zijn. “Je weet toch hna lmgharba (wij Marokkanen)” wordt er dan gezegd, “wij zoeken altijd problemen”.

Lees verder hier: Waarom keren we niet-vastende Marokkanen de rug toe?

Zie hier een overzicht van de andere teksten bij onze ramadanblogreeks.

Short translation of this latest text on our website:

Dutch-Moroccan Mariam Elmaslouhi writes as one of our ramadanbloggers about how Moroccans treat Moroccans who don’t fast. She asks why Moroccans in the Netherlands put so much energy in seeking support and approval of the White Autochtoon Dutch community while they turn their backs on people of their own community.

She asks why Moroccans who don’t fast are not accepted while Moroccan Muslims invite White Autochtoon Dutch people and even racists for iftars. Elmaslouhi hopes for a stronger Moroccan community to fight racism toghether and to defend the freedoms of all Moroccans.

(Autochtonen is what the white Dutch and Belgians call themselves, while immigrants, and especially Muslims, are labeled Allochtonen which means being ‘alien to this land’.)

— 1 week ago with 11 notes
#mariam elmaslouhi  #ramadan  #ramadan2014  #The Netherlands  #dutch moroccans  #marokkanen  #vasten  #islam  #moslims  #muslims  #alarteblog  #moroccan atheists 

Pictures by Douraïd Souissi

Douraïd is a very deep person with a high awareness and a personal reflexion on life. His sensitivity, meditation and subtlety can be read through his photographs. Anouar Brahem, the Tunisian oud player and composer, is a great source of inspiration for him.

The professional artist has a focus on his country Tunisia, its landscapes and people. His last exhibition was on the town El Kef located in Northwestern Tunisia and he will take part in the exhibition Views of Tunisia, coming September in Tunis.

See more here.

— 1 week ago with 2 notes
#sarah anouar  #douraïd souissi  #photography  #tunisia  #tunisie  #alartemagazine 

Pictures by Leila Alaoui

Alaoui’s photos show that in Morocco traveling from region to region seems more like traveling from country to country. The country’s cultural diversity is manifested in all aspects of life: the language, the clothing, the cuisine, but most of all in the people. With her collection Alaoui tries to capture Morocco’s different cultural identities, especially since nowadays a lot of traditions are disappearing. “One thing that is interesting for example, is that in the Berber villages all the older women have tattoos on their chins. These tattoos are marked at birth, so people know which tribe the woman belongs to, but you don’t see any young women with those tattoos anymore, it’s only the older generation. So these things are part of the disappearing traditions.”

More in our article Capturing Morocco’s Fading Traditions

— 2 weeks ago with 6 notes
#leila alaoui  #photography  #morocco  #marokko  #maroc  #tattoos  #traditions  #berber  #amazigh  #farah de haan  #alartemagazine 

From project Lost Walls of eL Seed

“What I would like from ‘Lost Walls’ is to give another image of Tunisia. After the revolution people now only link the country to politics. There has been governmental change of course, but the culture is still there, the history is still there and the focus should be on all of this beauty instead. I want to bring people back to Tunisia to discover the heritage that is left and lost there, just like the ‘Lost Walls’.”

Read and see more on our website.

— 2 weeks ago with 2 notes
#el Seed  #Tunisia  #Tunisie  #Lost Walls  #calligraffiti  #graffiti  #Tunesië 
LOCAL / NOT LOCAL: Arabic & Iranian Typography is an exhibition in California, USA. The show is about showcasing foreign or Non-Latin typography, by designers living in the US paying homage to their cultural roots through their design practice. In this case Local Not Local is an exhibition that showcases the works of Arabic and Iranian designers based in California. This connection is reflected in their work in the form of on-going client work from the Middle East, self initiated projects, or locally based client work.
“The point of this exhibit is to break the notion that Arabic and Iranian typography is only practised in the Middle East. Locally based Middle Eastern designers reveal through their design practice that Arabic and Iranian typography has a place in California through community based projects, collaborations, and client work from abroad done locally,” says the co-curator of the exhibit Maece Seirafi.
A series of Arab and Iranian designers based in California will be participating in the show: Yusef Alahmad, Sam Anvari, Milka Broukhim, Kourosh Beigpour, Reem Hammad, Pouya Jahanshahi, Paymon Pojhan, Ebrahim Poustinchi, Maece Seirafi, and Shilla Shakoori.
More information:
LOCAL/NOT LOCALJune 26 – Aug 29, 2014Opening Night Thursday June 26 | 6:00 P.M. Levantine Cultural Center5998 West Pico Blvd, Los Angeles, California

LOCAL / NOT LOCAL: Arabic & Iranian Typography is an exhibition in California, USA. The show is about showcasing foreign or Non-Latin typography, by designers living in the US paying homage to their cultural roots through their design practice. In this case Local Not Local is an exhibition that showcases the works of Arabic and Iranian designers based in California. This connection is reflected in their work in the form of on-going client work from the Middle East, self initiated projects, or locally based client work.

“The point of this exhibit is to break the notion that Arabic and Iranian typography is only practised in the Middle East. Locally based Middle Eastern designers reveal through their design practice that Arabic and Iranian typography has a place in California through community based projects, collaborations, and client work from abroad done locally,” says the co-curator of the exhibit Maece Seirafi.

A series of Arab and Iranian designers based in California will be participating in the show: Yusef Alahmad, Sam Anvari, Milka Broukhim, Kourosh Beigpour, Reem Hammad, Pouya Jahanshahi, Paymon Pojhan, Ebrahim Poustinchi, Maece Seirafi, and Shilla Shakoori.

More information:

LOCAL/NOT LOCAL
June 26 – Aug 29, 2014
Opening Night Thursday June 26 | 6:00 P.M.
Levantine Cultural Center
5998 West Pico Blvd, Los Angeles, California

— 3 weeks ago with 8 notes
#local not local  #california  #los angeles  #arabic  #iranian  #typography  #exhibition  #yusef alahmad  #sam anvari  #milka broukhim  #kourosh beigpour  #reem hammad  #pouyad jahanshavi  #paymon pojhan  #ebrahim poustinchi  #maece seirafi  #shilla shakoori 
Wash the blood from your feet

poetsofcolor:

Where should we go and what should we do
When every road is scattered
With the thorns of our fallen loves?
When the friendships of centuries
Have broken, one by one?

Whatever path we take, whatever direction we choose
Our feet come away bathed in blood.

And the onlookers say:
What is this ritual you have devised?
Why have you tattooed yourself with these wounds?
Who are you to question
The barrenness of faith?

Wash the blood from your feet.

When the night has passed 
A hundred new roads will blossom. 
You must steady your heart, 
For it has to break many, many times.

Faiz Ahmed Faiz 

(via lesetoilesnoires)

— 3 weeks ago with 9 notes
#poetry  #Faiz Ahmed Faiz  #poetsofcolor 
footybedsheets:

Baloch girls playing football in Iran. Beautiful. Joyous.
This pic makes me so incredibly happy.
And also why FIFA will never win.
Football is for all of us.

footybedsheets:

Baloch girls playing football in Iran.
Beautiful. Joyous.

This pic makes me so incredibly happy.

And also why FIFA will never win.

Football is for all of us.

— 3 weeks ago with 79 notes
#football  #soccer  #iran  #fifia  #photography 
We’re a little late with saying this, but still: we wish all Muslims a Ramadan Kareem. May it be filled with joy, faith, happiness and meals with people you love.
This poster was made for us by graphic designer and illustrator Moussa Fathi from Antwerp (Belgium).

We’re a little late with saying this, but still: we wish all Muslims a Ramadan Kareem. May it be filled with joy, faith, happiness and meals with people you love.

This poster was made for us by graphic designer and illustrator Moussa Fathi from Antwerp (Belgium).

— 3 weeks ago with 3 notes
#Ramadan  #Ramadan kareem  #art  #ramadan2014  #Moussa Fathi  #alartemagazine  #Muslims  #Islam 

© Reda Abdel Rahman

If you had asked the young Reda Abdel Rahman what he desired to become when he grew up, his answer would not have been ‘doctor’ or ‘engineer’. “An artist!”, he would say – and many years later this is an accomplished fact. ‘Legend’ is the name of the exhibition that showcased some of his work at Gallery Misr.

Born in the ‘City of Beauty and Enchantment’ on the west bank of the Suez Canal, Reda Abdel Rahman was bound to be fond of nature. Even in Cairo he picked one of the greenest areas to reside and work in: Dahab Island, in the Nile: “I live close to nature. It makes me feel close to the environment Ancient Egyptians were working in. On Dahab Island there are Muslims and Christians, churches and mosques. They don’t have any problems at all with each other – so far.”

The Minya born painter graduated from Minya University’s College of Fine Arts, a faculty amidst greenery, surrounded by Ancient Egyptian cultural heritage. Reda Abdel Rahman grabbed this opportunity with both hands. He benefited from his five-year student career to visit places like the Bani Hassan tombs, the ancient city of Abydos, and Sohag more than regularly and let Ancient Egypt touch his soul.

Made by an Egyptian

Ancient Egypt does not only constitute an inspiration source for the artist. Incorporating some of its artistic elements is Reda Abdel Rahman’s way to make clear that his paintings are by the hand of an Egyptian. “This is not the only way to portray my Egyptian identity,” he adds. “I also insert Coptic elements, such as halos, and the use a certain type of side view.” The painter is not able to pinpoint who exactly had an influence on his work: “I learn from everyone. I can even learn from my students. I don’t think that there are wrongs or rights when it comes to art. I do what I do, and that’s my message.”

More about Reda Abdel Rahman can be read and seen here on our website.

In Nederlands hier.

— 3 weeks ago with 2 notes
#Reda Abdel Rahman  #Egypt  #art  #Tine Lavent  #alartemag  #alartemagazine  #kunst  #egypte 

© Stefan Turk

Stefan Turk (1974, Trieste) is a Slovenian artist and art historian living in the far northeast of Italy who currently works as a supervisor and educator in various art workshops and summer camps for children organised by local cultural organisations and schools.

Working in various styles and applying differing techniques, Stefan Turk’s kaleidoscopic artwork has a charming, inspiring and often multi-layered nature both literally and metaphorically. Comprising a multitude of expressions ranging from children stories’ illustrations, landscapes, figurative art and abstract images, a significant part of his work is unmistakably reminiscent of the Maghreb and Orient. Some pieces incorporate Berber symbols and Arab geometric patterns, whereas others employ themes derived from popular medieval Sufi stories related to Attar, Rumi and the exemplary Mullah Nasruddin.

Read more in our interview with Stefan Turk.

In Nederlands hier.

— 3 weeks ago with 5 notes
#stefan turk  #art  #drawings  #alartemagazine  #alartemag  #Aya Johanna Daniëlle Durst Britt  #kunst 
"Het zou ook fijn als kijkers na de docu geen boog rond het pleintje zouden maken. Dat ze niet zouden bibberen. Het is gek als je ziet dat mensen voor Dembélé op de banken enthousiast staan te klappen, terwijl ze voor de jongens op de pleintjes een omweg maken."

Robbe van Lier - maker van documentaire De Pleintjes over jonge voetballers en de pleintjescultuur in Antwerpen

Lees het interview: 'Pleintjes zijn voor “allochtonen” wat de scouts voor mij waren'

— 1 month ago with 1 note
#de pleintjes  #voetbal  #voetbalpleintjes  #antwerpen  #borgerhout  #documentaire  #docu  #dembélé  #allochtonen  #alartemag  #Asma Ould Aissa  #alartemagazine 
"

Fighting African people on behalf of the Europeans doesn’t mean that I’m not proud of being black. I’m very proud of being black. But what I want to make clear is that I had no choice. As a French soldier, I had to obey the orders. I fought my African brothers, simply because I didn’t have a choice.

I was under the orders of the French army. When we first arrived in Algeria, the Algerians didn’t want to shoot us, because we were black people - we were their brothers. But when they realised that we were obliged to fight them, they didn’t hesitate to shoot at us.

I lost many of my friends and relatives in Algeria. And even now sometimes, when I sleep at night, I can see them in my nightmares - just the way I’m seeing you. This is a very painful situation. I an old man here in Dakar who walks the streets saying, “I’m going mad, I’m going mad”, because it’s still a nightmare. In 1956, the French were also fighting the Vietnamese; people who fought that battle, even now are still having nightmares. Even when they are not sleeping, they too feel they are going mad. So it is a very painful experience.

I regret a lot of things of course, because I lost many of my friends and relatives in the war, and because I had to kill many people. One of my friends and I were going on patrol and he was shot down by an Algerian and he was killed. That shocked me. We were recruited on the same day. We went into the field for training together. After that, we came back here to Dakar then went on to France, to Marseilles. After Marseilles we went to Strasbourg, and from Strasbourg we left for Algeria. And when we arrived in Algeria, we were in the same company and his bed was over mine. I was sleeping under him. And he was killed when we were patrolling together.

When I just returned from Algeria, I used to see the fighting quite often in my dreams. I used to have nightmares. And even when I look at my photos, those sad memories come back to my mind and I’m sad. But since I’ve been a civilian for a long time, I’m used to thinking of those sad images without being affected by them

"

- Isidore Mandiouban.

Former soldier in the French army as a Senegalese tirailleur during the Algerian War (documentary). 

(via dynamicafrica)

(via dynamicafrica)

— 1 month ago with 102 notes
#isidore mandiouban  #algerian war  #french army  #senegalese tirailleur  #war  #colonialism  #algeria  #africa  #documentary  #Aux origines de la guerre d'Algérie 

Work by Lina Amer from Saudi Arabia, a self-described calligraphist, digital artist, and graphic designer.

“To be honest I don’t beg to please an audience. I desire to satisfy myself and my feelings. My art is for myself only, it is my means of expressing my thoughts, my means to breathe, to indulge and meditate. In case someone would find that what I bring to the table should be admired, then I am very grateful to him. But of course getting his opinion would never be what I look for.”

Read and see more: Saudi graphic design to please the self

In Nederlands: Grafische vormgeving is Lina Amers zuurstof

— 1 month ago with 9 notes
#Lina Amer  #Saudi Arabia  #Graphic design  #arabic calligraphy  #digital art  #grafische vormgeving  #saudi arabië  #tine lavent  #alartemag  #alartemagazine  #kunst 

First picture: The Plastic Saint II - © Afagh Morrowatian
Second picture: Harfha I – © Afagh Morrowatian

Born in Iran, Afagh Morrowatian lives and works in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Plastic Saint is a collaborative project by Afagh Morrowatian and Y, a designer and artist based in Egypt and New York. “The project refers to religious icons and their relationship to the human behavior of trying to find the perfect human being.

One of Morrowatian’s earlier inspirational works is Harfha. Harfha means ‘those words we can not say’ – silenced by the society. “This work is based on fear. The fear that makes us say nothing when do want to say a lot. Oppression silences the human being, even in democratic open-minded societies. I wanted to capture the feelings of human beings acting normal yet feeling powerless. Powerless because of the way they are obliged to behave, speak and act.”

Read and see more: Meet upcoming multitalented artist Afagh Morrowatian

— 1 month ago with 13 notes
#Afagh Morrowatian  #Plastic Saint  #Iran  #Netherlands  #Harfha  #art  #alartemag  #alartemagazine  #Malikka Bouaissa 
The Tehran Times

The Tehran Times. A name that sounds familiar. The blog was founded in September 2012 by Iranian designer Araz Fazaeli as a spin-off of the actual Tehran Times, Iran’s largest English-language daily newspaper. After he spent some time abroad studying fashion Fazaeli wanted to start a blog with the aim of showing a side of Iran that is rarely highlighted by international media. Fazaeli’s blog shows the world that despite the strict dress code in Iran, women can still be fashionable.

From Fashion from the streets of contemporary Iran
Mode uit de straten van hedendaags Iran

The Tehran Times

The Tehran Times. A name that sounds familiar. The blog was founded in September 2012 by Iranian designer Araz Fazaeli as a spin-off of the actual Tehran Times, Iran’s largest English-language daily newspaper. After he spent some time abroad studying fashion Fazaeli wanted to start a blog with the aim of showing a side of Iran that is rarely highlighted by international media. Fazaeli’s blog shows the world that despite the strict dress code in Iran, women can still be fashionable.

From Fashion from the streets of contemporary Iran

Mode uit de straten van hedendaags Iran

— 1 month ago with 8 notes
#the tehran times  #fashion  #iran  #araz fazaeli  #clothes  #islam  #Farah de Haan  #alartemag  #alartemagazine